Thrust faults form when the lunar crust is pushed together, breaking the near-surface materials. The result is a steep slope on the surface called a scarp as shown in this diagram. Image: Arizona State University

Moonquakes Reveal the Moon is Still Shrinking & Shaking

Before humans go there again, it’d be smart to better understand the risks of lunar temblors.

Apollo astronauts left five seismometers scattered around the surface of the moon between 1969 and 1972, leading to the discovery of moonquakes and the realization that the moon is more geologically active than had…

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Independent health & science journalist writing motivationally about the science of physical health & mental wellness. Former editor-in-chief of LiveScience.

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Robert Roy Britt

Robert Roy Britt

Independent health & science journalist writing motivationally about the science of physical health & mental wellness. Former editor-in-chief of LiveScience.

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